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Do Not Track vs. Do Not Collect Data

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Recent events and privacy tracking issues are leading the advertising industry into a direction where there will be a need for a stricter definition of what the Do Not Track Law really means. Many industry professionals and the ad industry's self-regulatory group Digital Advertising Alliance are leaning more towards the law not only to mean Do Not Track, but do not collect data. In a statement from the FTC's commisioner, she also points this out as well as the possibility of a future where advertisers also cannot deduce something about a consumer even based on what they do NOT do or do NOT purchase. "Federal Trade Commissioner Julie Brill appeared to agree with those advocates [regarding do not collect data]. "For me, one of the most critical points is that Do Not Track is not just Do Not Target ... but also, when the consumer so chooses, Do Not Collect," she [URL="http://ftc.gov/speeches/brill/120228fordhamlawschool.pdf"]said[/URL] in a keynote address at a privacy conference held at Fordham Law School."
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Brill also specifically quoted a well known case where Target was essentially "caught" targeting customers based on purchasing behavior and able to figure out sensitive information about consumers, such as pregnancy.[LEFT][COLOR=#000000]

Read more: [URL]http://www.mediapost.com/publications/article/169317/ftcs-brill-do-not-track-means-do-not-collect-d.html?edition=44222#ixzz1pcF2KAsE[/URL][/COLOR][COLOR=#000000]

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