Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Sunrise, FL
    Posts
    115
    Blog Entries
    24

    Social Media Afterlife?

    There is a very interesting story in Mashable today: Facebook After Death: What Should the Law Say? I am actually surprised to hear that there is not already legislation on this. There is a real need for leaving instructions or a "social will" of some sort to say what happens to not only your social media profiles, but Youtube videos, blogs, websites, etc. when you pass on. I write my personal blog for my daughter and I never before thought of including passwords or documentation in my will to make sure she gets access to it. Besides issues like that, there might be a lot of dead space taken up on the internet (pun intended) with profiles that are no longer in use.
    Shari McConahay


  2. #2
    Free Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Boca Raton, FL
    Posts
    275
    You can actually fill out a form here: http://www.facebook.com/help/contact..._form=deceased to report someone deceased on Facebook. Their profile then becomes a memorial and they are taken off your news feed and removed from suggested friends or people you should "reconnect" with.

  3. #3
    Administrator
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Sunrise, FL
    Posts
    115
    Blog Entries
    24
    Oh! I never knew that. But I guess that is because luckily I have not run across that situation before.
    Shari McConahay


  4. #4
    Free Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Boca Raton, FL
    Posts
    275
    One of my distant cousins passed away recently and my mom was friends with her on Facebook. Facebook kept telling her she hadn't interacted with her in a while and that she should "reconnect" with her. It was very upsetting for her and I'm glad Facebook has a way to prevent this from happening.

    However, when it comes to family members gaining access to social networking accounts after the user had passed, I'm not sure the law should be involved in this. I think - like you said - if users have wishes for when they are gone, this should be expressed in their will. As social networks gain in popularity (especially among the elderly population) I think this will become more commonplace.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •